Download A Philosophical Walking Tour with C.S. Lewis: Why It Did Not by Stewart Goetz PDF

By Stewart Goetz

Although it's been nearly seventy years on the grounds that Time declared C.S. Lewis one of many world's so much influential spokespersons for Christianity and fifty years due to the fact that Lewis's dying, his impression is still simply as nice if no longer larger at the present time.

whereas a lot has been written on Lewis and his paintings, nearly not anything has been written from a philosophical point of view on his perspectives of happiness, excitement, ache, and the soul and physique. hence, nobody to this point has well-known that his perspectives on those issues are deeply fascinating and arguable, and-perhaps extra jarring-no one has but appropriately defined why Lewis by no means grew to become a Roman Catholic. Stewart Goetz's cautious research of Lewis's philosophical idea unearths oft-overlooked implications and demonstrates that it was once, at its root, at odds with that of Thomas Aquinas and, thereby, the Roman Catholic Church.

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S. Lewis, An Experiment in Criticism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1961), 37. C. S. Lewis, Present Concerns, (New York: Harcourt, 1986), 67–8. Hedonistic Happiness 33 as their razor edge all joys would have been insipid to him. ” His God-ward will rode his happiness like a wellmanaged horse . . 54 Moreover, he affirmed that pleasure can and should accompany virtuous activity. But while he knew pleasures might become idols and allied with pride, he stressed that they need not suffer this fate.

Here we must turn to another explanation for the title of the book, which is philosophical in nature. This explanation is found in The Problem of Pain itself, where Lewis wrote that “Pain is unmasked, unmistakable evil . . ”24 Given that Lewis believed pain is evil, it is not at all difficult to see how he agreed to the title The Problem of Pain. In claiming that pain is “unmasked, unmistakable evil,” Lewis was asserting that pain is intrinsically evil. It is in and of itself and, therefore, in 22 23 24 Lewis, The Problem of Pain, 27–8.

Lewis, Present Concerns, (New York: Harcourt, 1986), 67–8. Hedonistic Happiness 33 as their razor edge all joys would have been insipid to him. ” His God-ward will rode his happiness like a wellmanaged horse . . 54 Moreover, he affirmed that pleasure can and should accompany virtuous activity. But while he knew pleasures might become idols and allied with pride, he stressed that they need not suffer this fate. Indeed, he thought that when pleasures are understood correctly they actually point us to God: We can’t—or I can’t—hear the song of a bird simply as a sound.

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